Battles We Must Lose To Win

Ayo is an OND holder who now has a thriving business. He is dating Jane, a freshman in the university. Because Jane comes from a penurious background, Ayo has opted to foot all her school bills; and not only that, he takes care of her feeding and general welfare also. The lovers have an agreement to get married as soon as Jane concludes the mandatory National Youth Service Corps. Their parents are also aware of this, and Jane’s parents who live in the village are especially grateful to Ayo for the constant financial support he lends.

Busola Dakolo's Rape Allegation Against Pastor Biodun Fatoyinbo

Bringing Rape Home For The Thomases

I suffer from shock. Anytime something untoward or unexpected happens to me, I am immobile for a few seconds or minutes before gathering myself and willing myself into a reaction. This also means that I am not the type to shout, burst into tears or wail on receiving unpleasant news. The tears come later…after processing events. My friend, Anna (real name withheld), on the other hand, is highly emotional. The tears are never far away whenever she gets upsetting news; at other times, she would let out a scream or shout of pain. Two friends, two different reactions to bad news.

Everything is an inside job

Everything Is An Inside Job

If there’s a category of people who know a thing or two about rejection, self-doubt and uncertainty, it is writers. One time a police officer asked what I did what for a living and when I simply said “Writer”, I could see the quizzical look on his face. A look that asked, “Is that even a job?”. Toeing a path where you are never sure of the outcome of your efforts can be mind-crippling. For the creative, there’s the constant pressure to create; and not just create, but surpass the success of previous work. 

The Inevitability Of Process

Process can be such a frustrating phenomenon. Think about it: you have to save and invest consistently over a period of time (years or even decades) to build wealth. A woman has to carry a child for three-quarters of a year before she births it. And after this, it takes years and years of raising and nurturing before the child gets a chance to be independent. In these parts, we have to go through 6 years of primary education, 6 years of secondary education and at least 4 years of tertiary schooling to become a graduate. An eventuality that in no way guarantees success or wealth.

The Secret

Zita was getting married soon and Nnamdi was not looking forward to the now imminent time when he would be the only child at home.

Her husband, Stanley and his people were due in Mbaise for their traditional wedding in a fortnight.

“I am going to be so bored when Zita leaves this house.” He said

The family was having their Sunday dinner. It was an unwritten rule that they all had their Sunday evening meal together to bond as a family and Nnamdi was worried about he would cope without his only sister.

15 Ways Meditation Can Help You Live A Better Life

 

Meditation is a technique and positive activity that can help you to live a better life. People who are in alcoholism recovery, anxiety recovery, post-trauma stress disorder (PTSD) recovery, and other types of recovery use meditation to help them handle their emotions and everyday life. You can use meditation to help you in a variety of ways:

Conversation Is The Real Romance

Someone to talk to. A concept that is simple and seemingly common but in reality, hard to find. What we consider conversation most times is idle chit-chat; small talk that holds no weight. But the baring of the soul, no holds barred exchange with another is a rarity. At a time when trusting associates with private information is a precarious venture no thanks to the trend of letting it all out on social media, the circumspect keep their most treasured thoughts tucked in the recesses of their heart. They would rather it killed them than run the risk of spilling to someone who might divulge it to others.

Avoiding The Naira Marley And Danny Baker Gaffes

Two separate faux pas in vastly different climes stemming from posts in the virtual space produced regrettable outcomes—a police detainment—and a firing. Aftermaths that underscore the fact that social media isn’t an isolated platform or negligible medium and virtual recklessness in form of crass jokes or cheeky remarks are still liable to be punished. Recently, up-and-coming artiste, Naira Marley unwittingly initiated his own arrest when men of the anti-fraud agency, EFCC paid him an early morning visit and subsequently detained him because of his endorsement of fraudsters, popularly called “Yahoo Boys” while BBC radio and TV host, Danny Baker was fired by his employers on account of his apalling tweet regarding the royal newborn.

5 Lessons I Learnt From 5 Years Of Blogging

I am in a state of wavering disbelief right now. I am having a hard time believing I have actually blogged for five whole years! Every week, every Wednesday, I have shared my thoughts, feelings and opinion on wide-ranging subjects—when I was excited—and when the last thing I wanted to do was write. I have battled the imposter syndrome; written essays that barely got a hundred views and been misunderstood for my blogging intentions. But I have also enjoyed unbelievable goodwill from strangers: people who overestimated my talent and called me a genius.